Reader's Advisory, YA Posts

Book Review: Uglies

Highly Recommended

First published in 2005, Uglies is the first installment of a New York Times bestselling series, written by Scott Westerfeld. Uglies is narrated by Tally Youngblood, a teenage girl who lives in three hundred years in the future. In Tally’s society, when teenagers reach their sixteenth birthday, they are transformed by cosmetic surgery to be beautiful. After their surgery, the teens move to a new city, where they live without responsibilities or obligations. As the novel unfolds, Tally discovers that the operation, and the life you lead after it, isn’t as perfect as it seems.

The story asks important questions about friendship, bullying, and the socially constructed idea of beauty. It has opened up interesting conversations about using cosmetic surgery to alter your appearance. As a dystopia, the story also engages readers to think about political power and control, as well as privacy in the modern age. Westerfeld uses simple, obvious names to clearly incorporate dystopic and futuristic elements, using names like ‘Pretty New Town’ and ‘Uglyville’. He carefully describes futuristic inventions like toothbrush pills and hoverboards, making the world of the books easily accessible.

Shorter chapters may make this book appealing for reluctant or slower readers. The fact that this book is part of a popular series is another important appeal factor for many young adult readers. The covers on the 2011 editions on the series feature close-ups of female body parts and a delicate font, meaning that the books may appeal more to female readers than male.

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Reader's Advisory, YA Posts

Book Review: The House on Mango Street

Highly Recommended

Sandra Cisneros wrote The House On Mango Street in 1984. It is a coming of age novel narrated by Esperanza, who speaks life as a young Latina girl in Chicago in a series of short, poetic vignettes, organized into little chapters. The vignettes are punctuated with beautiful images, and simple, poetic language. The short chapters illustrate different aspects of Esperanza’s life in creative, thoughtful ways. One chapter is devoted to describing the different kinds of hair her family members have, while another compares the children in her neighbourhood to birds.

She describes her neighbours, friends, family and teachers, leaving much unsaid but revealing stories that are complex, thought provoking, and touching. Esperanza’s keen observations touch on racism, poverty, religion, gender roles, sexual assault and class issues. Cisneros’ writing is skillful and deals delicately with the heavier issues, juxtaposing them with humour, poetry and beautiful images.

An important and reoccurring theme throughout the chapters is Esperanza’s desire for a permanent house for her family. She also devotes many chapters to observing the role of women in her community, noticing that many of them are limited and isolated by their domestic roles and the way they are treated by the men in their lives. As the story progresses, Esperanza becomes increasingly committed to a living her life as an independent, unmarried, woman, using her writing to focus on her dreams.

While young girls who are interested in gender roles and class issues may related best to the story, it is a good recommendation for any reader who appreciates good writing. It may also be a good selection for reluctant readers of poetry, and is a good introduction to elements of post-modern storytelling. The House On Mango Street is a classic that should never be forgotten.

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Reader's Advisory, YA Posts

Reader’s Advisory: Purple Hibiscus

“Stories matter. Many stories matter. Stories have been used to dispossess and to malign, but stories can also be used to empower and to humanize. Stories can break the dignity of a people, but stories can also repair that broken dignity” (Adichie)

Purple Hibiscus tell the story of Kimbali, a 14 year old in post-colonial Nigeria. Her father is a ‘Big Man,’ a man who is incredibly wealthy. Her father is a devout, fanatical Catholic. Her mother is humble, timid woman, who “speaks the way a bird eats.” Her father subjects Kimbali, her older brother, and her mother to intense physical, and emotional abuse. The novel traces the slow disintegration of Kimbali’s family unit amid the political turmoil in Nigeria in the 1990s.

Purple Hibiscus is set largely in Nsuakka, where Adichie grew up. Both of Adichie’s parents worked and taught at the University of Nigeria, where, in the novel, Kimbali’s aunt is a lecturer. The University of Nigeria was the first autonomous and indigenous university in the country, established in 1955.  Nsukka, an intellectual haven that vies for democracy and social rights, becomes a safe place for Kimbali, a place of both peace and growth.

I was thrilled to see Adichie on our reading list. Her novel Half of a Yellow Sun remains one of my favourite books, ever. I wouldn’t call Half of a Yellow Sun YA reading by any stretch though, so I was surprised that Adichie had written a YA novel. Although a teenager narrates Purple Hibiscus, I wouldn’t necessarily recommend this book to all young adult readers. The novel delves into very intense issues: colonialism, religious fanaticism, immigration, and domestic abuse. Adichie handles the more graphic senses delicately, but the portrayal is still deeply disturbing.

What is amazing about Adichie’s work is the way that she makes the country come alive.  Colours, sounds, smells, textures are vivid and real. She makes the Nigeria of her childhood come alive in brilliant colour. And true to her words (at the top of this post), she displays characters who have grace, dignity, and beautifully human flaws.

References

Adichie, Chimamanda Ngozi. “The Danger of a Single Story.” TED Talk. July 2009. 18 minutes. Web.

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